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RollerCoaster Tycoon 2 - Strategy Guide Walkthrough, Hints and Tips for PC Games.

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 RollerCoaster Tycoon 2 - Strategy Guide

 
   
 
 
RollerCoaster Tycoon 2 - Strategy Guide

v2.00 3/19/08 
-------------
by Joseph Mostarda (e-mail: jmostarda@live.com)

Table of Contents: 
Section 1 (Copyrights)                  [AAAA]
---------------------- 
1.01 - Copyrights                       [AAAB]
1.02 - Version History                  [AABC]

Section 2 (Rides)                       [AAAC]
----------------- 
2.01 - Ride List                        [AAAD]
2.02 - Multi-Dimensional Roller Coaster [AAAE]

Section 3 (Shops & Stalls)              [AAAF]
-------------------------- 
3.01 - Shops & Stalls List              [AAAG]

Section 4 (Transportation)              [AAAH]
-------------------------- 
4.01 - Footpaths                        [AAAI]
4.02 - Queue Lines                      [AAAJ]
4.03 - Transport Rides List             [AAAK]
4.04 - Ride Exits                       [AABK]
4.05 - Scenic Footpaths                 [AABL]
4.06 - A Quick Tip...                   [AABM]
4.07 - ...And How About Another?        [AABN]
4.08 - Avoiding Design Confusion        [AABO]
4.09 - The Chairlift                    [AABP]
4.10 - The Elevator                     [AABQ]
4.11 - The Monorail                     [AABR]
4.12 - Miniature Railroad               [AABS]
4.13 - The Tram                         [AABT]

Section 5 (Expenditures & Finances)     [AAAL]
----------------------------------- 
5.01 - Cash on Hand                     [AAAM]
5.02 - Fiscal Reports                   [AAAN]
5.03 - Special Financial Tools          [AAAO]

Section 6 (Sandbox Mode)                [AAAP]
------------------------ 
6.01 - The Roller Coaster Designer      [AAAQ] 
6.02 - The Scenario Editor              [AAAR]

Section 7 (Tips & Tricks)               [AAAS]
------------------------- 
7.01 - Tips for Countering Vandalism    [AABD]
7.02 - Working With the Elevator        [AABF]
7.03 - Maximizing Ride Excitement       [AAAT]
7.04 - Working With Station Platforms   [AABG]
7.05 - Dealing With Ride Accidents      [AABH]
7.06 - Transportation Networks          [AABI]
7.07 - Having Fun with Vandals          [AABE]

Section 8 (Easter Eggs & Secrets)       [AAAU]
---------------------------------
8.01 - Chris Sawyer                     [AAAV]
8.02 - Simon Foster                     [AAAW]
8.03 - Melanie Warn                     [AABU]
8.04 - Katie Brayshaw                   [AABV]
8.05 - John Wardley                     [AAAX]
8.06 - Damon Hill                       [AABW]
8.07 - Mr. Bean                         [AABX]
8.08 - Tony Day                         [AAAY]
8.09 - David Ellis                      [AAAZ]
8.10 - Trainers                         [AABA]
8.11 - Instant Revenue Glitch           [AABB]

(Tip: Use Ctrl+F + [navigation code] to quickly navigate this FAQ.)

Section 1 - Copyrights [AAAA]
---------------------- 
1.01 - Copyrights [AAAB]
----
Feel free to download this FAQ for your own personal use. All I ask is
that you don't sell it for profit or any form of commercial means. I
also grant unlimited permission for this FAQ to be posted on any other
website, so long as proper credit is given to me as the author of this
FAQ.

1.02 - Version History [AABC]
---
3/19/08 - Version 2 is now complete. This is a complete rewrite of the
FAQ. In addition to several new sections, I also decided to cancel the
scenario walkthrough, as this guide is only intended to serve as an
overview of the game's features. Version 2 features a completely new
structure that is designed to be much, much easier to navigate.

2004 - Initial version 1 of the FAQ is posted. Outlines all the main
features of the game, with a planned scenario walkthrough. In
retrospect, this version was terrible. Near impossible to navigate,
and full of bad grammar.

2003 - After playing through much of RollerCoaster Tycoon 2, I began
to write this strategy guide. Took several months before I submitted
it in early 2004.

Section 2 - Rides [AAAC]
----------------- 
2.01 - Ride List [AAAD]
---- 
Transport Rides 
--------------- 
Type: Chairlift 
Approx. Cost: $1,440+ 
Running
Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode / Shuttle Mode

Type: Elevator 
Approx. Cost: $624+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Shuttle Mode

Type: Miniature Railway 
Approx. Cost: $1,300+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Monorail 
Approx. Cost: $1,550+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode / Shuttle Mode

Type: Suspended Monorail 
Approx. Cost: $2,400+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode / Shuttle Mode

Type: Trams 
Approx. Cost: $1,300+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode / Shuttle Mode

Gentle Rides 
------------ 
Type: Car Ride 
Approx. Cost: $540+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit

Type: Cheshire Cats 
Approx. Cost: $540+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit

Type: Circus Show 
Approx. Cost: $500 
Running Cost p/h: $49.60 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Crooked House 
Approx. Cost: $260 
Running Cost p/h: $28.80
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Dodgems 
Approx. Cost: $440 
Running Cost p/h: $108.80 
Modes: Bumper Car Mode

Type: Double-Deck Observation Tower 
Approx. Cost: $592+ 
Running Cost p/h: $60.80 
Modes: Continuous Circuit

Type: Ferris Wheel 
Approx. Cost: $450 
Running Cost p/h: $49.60 
Modes: Continuous Circuit

Type: Flying Saucers 
Approx. Cost: $560 
Running Cost p/h: $148.80
Modes: Bumper Car Mode

Type: Ghost Train 
Approx. Cost: $540+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Haunted House 
Approx. Cost: $340 
Running Cost p/h: $49.60
Modes: Continuous Circuit

Type: Haunted Mansion Ride 
Approx. Cost: $570+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Modes: Continuous Circuit

Type: Merry-Go-Round 
Approx. Cost: $460 
Running Cost p/h: $49.60
Modes: Continuous Circuit

Type: Mini Golf 
Approx. Cost: $740+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Mini Helicopters 
Approx. Cost: $540+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Modes: Continuous Circuit

Type: Mini Maze 
Approx. Cost: $216+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Maze Mode

Type: Monorail Cycles 
Approx. Cost: $450+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Monster Trucks 
Approx. Cost: $540+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Observation Tower 
Approx. Cost: $592+ 
Running Cost p/h: $60.80
Modes: Continuous Circuit

Type: Space Rings 
Approx. Cost: $288 
Running Cost p/h: $49.60 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Spiral Slide 
Approx. Cost: $330 
Running Cost p/h: $49.60 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode [One Ride] [Unlimited Rides]

Type: Vintage Cars 
Approx. Cost: $540+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Thrill Rides 
------------ 
Type: 3D Cinema 
Approx. Cost: $560 
Running Cost p/h: $49.60 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Enterprise 
Approx. Cost: $800 
Running Cost p/h: $49.60 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Go-Karts 
Approx. Cost: $920+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Race Mode/Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Launched Freefall 
Approx. Cost: $800+ 
Running Cost p/h: $60.80
Modes: Upward Launch Mode/Downward Launch Mode

Type: Magic Carpet 
Approx. Cost: $396 
Running Cost p/h: $49.60 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Motion Simulator 
Approx. Cost: $440 
Running Cost p/h: $49.60
Modes: "Avenging Aviators" / "Thrill Seekers"

Type: Pirate Ship 
Approx. Cost: $387 
Running Cost p/h: $49.60 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Roto Drop 
Approx. Cost: $880+ 
Running Cost p/h: $60.80 
Modes: Downward Launch Mode

Type: Snow Cups 
Approx. Cost: $360 
Running Cost p/h: $49.60 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Swinging Inverter 
Approx. Cost: $424 
Running Cost p/h: $49.60
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Top Spin 
Approx. Cost: $580 
Running Cost p/h: $49.60 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Twist 
Approx. Cost: $360 
Running Cost p/h: $49.60 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Water Rides 
----------- 
Type: Bumper Boats 
Approx. Cost: $205+
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Canoes 
Approx. Cost: $205+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Dinghy Slide 
Approx. Cost: $1,200+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Jet Skis 
Approx. Cost: $205 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Log Flume 
Approx. Cost: $1,320+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: River Rafts 
Approx. Cost: $900+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: River Rapids 
Approx. Cost: $1,840+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Rowing Boats 
Approx. Cost: $205+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Splash Boats 
Approx. Cost: $1,640+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Submarine Ride 
Approx. Cost: $260+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Swans 
Approx. Cost: $205+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Water Coaster 
Approx. Cost: $1,640 
Running Cost p/h: N/A 
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Water Tricycles 
Approx. Cost: $205+ 
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Modes: Continuous Circuit Mode

Roller Coasters 
--------------- 
Type: Air-Powered Vertical
Approx. Cost: $6,750+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Bobsleigh Coaster
Approx. Cost: $2,700+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Compact Inverted Coaster
Approx. Cost: $3,750+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Corkscrew Roller Coaster
Approx. Cost: $3,900+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode/Reverse Incline Shuttle Mode

Type: Floorless Coaster
Approx. Cost: $4,950+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Flying Roller Coaster
Approx. Cost: $4,650+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Flying Turns
Approx. Base Cost: $2,700+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Giga Coaster
Approx. Cost: $4,950+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Heartline Twister Coaster
Approx. Cost: $3,030+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Hypercoaster
Approx. Cost: $3,900+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Hyper-Twister Roller Coaster
Approx. Cost: $4,950+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Inverted Hairpin Coaster
Approx. Cost: $2,000+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Inverted Impulse Coaster
Approx. Cost: $2,325+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Powered Launch Mode

Type: Inverted Roller Coaster
Approx. Cost: $2,325+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Inverted Shuttle Coaster
Approx. Cost: $3,750+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Reverse Inclined Shuttle Mode

Type: Inverted Vertical Shuttle
Approx. Cost: $3,370+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Reverse Inclined Shuttle Mode

Type: Junior Roller Coaster
Approx. Cost: $1,320+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Lay-Down Roller Coaster
Approx. Cost: $4,000+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: LIM Roller Coaster
Approx. Cost: $3,550+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Powered Launch Mode

Type: Looping Roller Coaster
Approx. Cost: $3,350+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode/Powered Launch Mode

Type: Mine Ride
Approx. Cost: $2,520+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Mine Train Coaster
Approx. Cost: $3,050
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Mini Roller Coaster
Approx. Cost: $1,920
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Mini Suspended Coaster
Approx. Cost: $1,800+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Mini Suspended Flying Coaster
Approx. Cost: $1,800+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Motorbike Racers
Approx. Cost: $1,680+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Multi-Dimension Roller Coaster
Approx. Cost: $6,750+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Reverse Freefall Coaster
Approx. Cost: $6,750+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Powered Launch Mode

Type: Reverser Roller Coaster
Approx. Cost: $1,517+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Side-Friction Roller Coaster
Approx. Cost: $1,517+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Soap Box Derby Racers
Approx. Cost: $1,680+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Spinning Wild Mouse
Approx. Cost: $1,640+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Spiral Roller Coaster
Approx. Cost: $2,600+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Stand-up Roller Coaster
Approx. Cost: $3,750+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Stand-up Twister Coaster
Approx. Cost: $4,950+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Steeplechase
Approx. Cost: $1,680+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Suspended Swinging Coaster
Approx. Cost: $3,550+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Twister Roller Coaster
Approx. Cost: $4,950+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Wild Mouse
Approx. Cost: $1,640+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Wooden Roller Coaster
Approx. Cost: $2,800+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Wooden Wild Mine Ride
Approx. Cost: $1,480+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Wooden Wild Mouse
Approx. Cost: $1,480+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Vertical Drop Roller Coaster
Approx. Cost: $3,780+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

Type: Virginia Reel
Approx. Cost: $975+
Running Cost p/h: N/A
Mode: Continuous Circuit Mode

2.02 - Multi-Dimensional Roller Coaster [AAAE]
---- 
When working with a Multi-Dimensional Roller Coaster, remember that
the cars face backward in their normal position, or 0 degrees. Thus,
if you rotate the seats by 180 degrees, the cars will now face
forward. Here's a very simple list of some common degree settings you
might want to incorporate into your design...

Commonly Used Degrees 
--------------------- 
0 degrees - Neutral position (trains face backward) 
90 degrees - Halfway position (trains can face downward or upward) 
180 degrees - Inverted position (trains face forward) 
360 degrees - Looping position (trains make a complete revolution and
return to previous position)
495 degrees - Hyper-looping position (trains make a complete
revolution and then deviate to 90 degrees past the previous position)

Creating an effective track design 
----------------------------------
The biggest appeal of the Multi-Dimensional Roller Coaster over other
designs is that you can rotate the trains into almost limitless
positions. Thus, you can create the scariest and most suspenseful
setup to keep the guests coming back time and time again. Let me give
an example. Like most other types of roller coasters, the Multi-
Dimensional Roller Coaster can allow for vertical drops. However, on
other types, the trains are static, unable to be positioned into a way
that cloaks the drop, making it very unexpected. As you can probably
guess, this limitation does not exist for the Multi-Dimensional. You
can start the ride with the trains facing in the neutral position, and
then rotate the trains 90 degrees so that when the vertical drop
occurs, the riders are facing straight up. Another example would be
rotating the trains in such a way so that riders feel like they are
"flying," because they are parallel to the ground. So as you can see,
the key to creating an effective track design lies with the set
rotations. It's also what makes the Multi-Dimensional Roller Coaster
expensive, but highly unique. Installing one in your park guarantees
high profit, at least in the short term.

Section 3 - Shops & Stalls [AAAF]
-------------------------- 
3.01 - Shops & Stalls List [AAAG]
---- 
Novelty Stalls 
-------------- 
Type: Balloon Stall
Approx. Cost: $200 
Base Product Cost: $.90 
Profit: $.60

Type: Hat Stall 
Approx. Cost: $200 
Base Product Cost: $1.50 
Profit: $.60

Type: Souvenir Stall 
Approx. Cost: $200 
Base Product Cost: $2.50/$2.50 
Profit: $1.00/$.50

Type: Sunglasses Stall 
Approx. Cost: $200 
Base Product Cost: $1.50
Profit: $.70

Type: T-Shirt Stall 
Approx. Cost: $200 
Base Product Cost: $3.00
Profit: $1.00

Food Stalls 
----------- 
Type: Beef Noodle Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300
Base Product Cost: $1.50 
Profit: $.80

Type: Burger Bar 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $1.50 
Profit: $1.00

Type: Candy Apple Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $.70
Profit: $.30

Type: Chicken Nuggets Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $1.50 
Profit: $1.00

Type: Fries Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $1.50 
Profit: $1.10

Type: Cookie Shop 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $.70 
Profit: $.30

Type: Cotton Candy Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $.80
Profit: $.50

Type: Donut Shop 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $.70 
Profit: $.30

Type: Fried Chicken Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $1.50
Profit: $1.00

Type: Fried Rice Noodles Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $1.50 
Profit: $.90

Type: Fries Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $1.50 
Profit: $1.10

Type: Fruity Ices Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $.90
Profit: $.50

Type: Funnel Cake Shop 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $1.20
Profit: $.70

Type: Hot Dog Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $1.00
Profit: $.50

Type: Ice Cream Cone Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $.90
Profit: $.50

Type: Meatball Soup Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $1.50
Profit: $1.00

Type: Pizza Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $1.60 Profit:
$1.00

Type: Popcorn Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $1.20
Profit: $.70

Type: Pretzel Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $1.10
Profit: $.60

Type: Roast Sausage Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $1.50
Profit: $1.00

Type: Seafood Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $1.50
Profit: $1.00

Type: Sub Sandwich Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $1.50
Profit: $1.00

Type: Wonton Soup Stall 
Approx. Cost: $300 
Base Product Cost: $1.50
Profit: $1.10

Drink Stalls 
------------ 
Type: Coffee Shop 
Approx. Cost: $250 
Base Product Cost: $1.20 
Profit: $.90

Type: Drink Stall 
Approx. Cost: $250 
Base Product Cost: $1.20 
Profit:$.90

Type: Hot Chocolate Stall 
Approx. Cost: $250 
Base Product Cost: $1.20
Profit: $.80

Type: Iced Tea Stall 
Approx. Cost: $250 
Base Product Cost: $1.20
Profit: $.80

Type: Lemonade Stall 
Approx. Cost: $250 
Base Product Cost: $1.20
Profit: $.80

Type: Soybean Milk Stall 
Approx. Cost: $250 
Base Product Cost: $1.20
Profit: $.80

Type: Star Fruit Drink Stall 
Approx. Cost: $250 
Base Product Cost: $1.20 
Profit: $.80

Type: Sujongkwa Stall 
Approx. Cost: $250 
Base Product Cost: $1.20
Profit: $.90

"Essential" Buildings 
--------------------- 
Type: Cash Machine
Approx. Cost: $200

Type: First Aid Station 
Approx. Cost: $250

Type: Information Kiosk 
Approx. Cost: $250 
Base Product Cost: $.60 / $2.50 
Profit: $.50 / $.50

Type: Restroom 
Approx. Cost: $225

Section 4 - Transportation [AAAH]
-------------------------- 
Your park is only as good as its transit network. What's the point of
building a great roller coaster if your guests can't access it? When
designing a footpath network within your park, there is one important
rule to remember: guests hate walking. The less walking your guests
have to do, the happier they will be, and happy guests spend more
money at your park. The shortest path between two points is a straight
line, which is exactly how you want your network laid out. Let's
analyze a small park, starting with something as mundane as a simple
entrance path.

4.01 - The Entrance Path [AAAI]
---- 
You may not realize it, but this is arguably the most important path
in your park. The entrance path is what gets your guests in and out of
your park. Therefore, you want it not only wide, but full of vital
shops and stalls. Consider: What if you had very little cash upon
paying to enter the park? Wouldn't you appreciate an ATM just past the
park entrance?

So, begin by making the entrance path at least 2 units wide. This will
help prevent crowding, and also serves a reminder to guests as to
where the path goes. Make sure you have at least one ATM, one
Information Kiosk, and one Restroom along the path. Also, benches and
litter bins are a good idea. If possible, having access to a Transport
Ride is a very good idea, too! That way, you further prevent crowding,
and make money, too!

However, don't make your entrance path too long. Believe it or not,
guests whom have been in your park for just 5 minutes do get tired.

4.02 - Large Footpaths [AAAJ]
---- 
Most parks will feature one wide, long path that leads to all of the
major areas and rides. Therefore, you must distinguish this "main"
path from all the others! To do that, remember to keep that path at
least 5 units wide! Also, always keep that path "littered" with
benches, litter bins, lamps, shops, stalls, and rides! By keeping
scenery along your "main" path, you also keep guests entertained,
which helps to prevent vandalism while raising your park rating, too!

Make sure the "main" path is marked by banner signs, and always have
at least one Transport ride station go to the "main" path. That way,
guests will rarely get lost. Or, if a guest gets tired in the back of
the park, they can get on the Transport and take it to the "main"
path.

When designed intelligently, a "main" path can be almost as
entertaining as a ride! Plus, an intelligently designed "main" path
will quickly herd your guests from area to area!

4.03 - Queue Lines [AAAK]
---- 
Your queue lines are more important than you may think. While they're
only purpose is to move guests from one location to another, they also
act as the guests' first impressions of your ride. As a smart park
engineer, you should take care to make your queue lines well designed
and interesting. Here are some suggestions to get you started.

Minimalism 
---------- 
For a Gentle or Thrill, use this approach. Basically, it lets you
squeeze in a lot of queue units in a relatively small area. First,
build your entrance station. Then, wrap your queue around part of the
ride. Then, swing the whole line back to the front, and send it to the
main path. While it covers a small amount of ground, it holds a lot of
guests, which is always a good thing!

Exciting Queue Lines 
-------------------- 
For a roller coaster, this is a good type of queue line. Basically, it
winds around an exciting part of the coaster, usually a vertical drop.
Plus, like the Compact Approach, it holds a lot of guests in a small
space. First, build your entrance station. (This approach works best
if the entrance station is raised.) Then, build a queue that winds
downward, preferably down a vertical slope. Finally, connect the queue
to the main path. Open the ride. As you will quickly notice, guests
will not only enjoy the queue because it goes around an exciting part
of the ride, many guests will also be on the queue. Another advantage
to the Intense Approach is that it raises both satisfaction and
popularity for the ride.

High Capacity Queue Lines 
------------------------- 
For maximum capacity, nothing beats the Cobra Approach. By winding the
queue around both the ride and itself, you will hold many, many
guests. It is very simple to build, too. As always, build your
entrance station. Then, build your queue in a straight line. However,
right before you get to the main path, curve it so that it goes back
to the left or right of itself. Then, once you get to the ride, curve
it again. Keep curving it until you see fit. Once connected to the
main path, it will look like a cobra. Plus, with the spaces in between
the queue units, you have room for landscaping. Out of the many
options for queue paths, this is the most commonly used, and the
easiest to build.

What if you don't want a queue line?
------------------------------------ 
Yes, it is possible to have no queue for a ride, but it isn't very
wise unless you are willing to suffer from little to no guests per
hour. That equals out to little income from the ride. However, if it
is needed or works for you, then go for it. Obviously, all you have to
do is connect the entrance station to the main path directly. While
long lines will never be a problem for the ride, only two people can
actually wait in line. So, again, only use the No Queue Approach when
it is necessary. It robs you of income that you may desperately need.

Making your queue lines interesting
----------------------------------- 
While a filled queue line is a very exciting proposition, it also
leads to long wait times and overcrowding. No matter how cool your
roller coaster may be, guests will not want to wait more than 10
minutes, and you may notice guests continually leaving the ride
because they can't tolerate the wait. How do you balance a
high-capacity queue line while still keeping the guests happy?

The easiest step is to hire Entertainers, and confine their area of
influence to the queue line and the area just outside of it.
Entertainments will keep your guests happy, or at least keep their
minds off the long queue times.

"Dynamic Queue Lines" 
---------------------
First, build a normal queue line. After it is built, place a small row
of queue tiles next to it. If the ride gets popular, and the queue is
constantly filled, then connect the excess rows to your line, and you
now have a longer queue line! If the lines get too crowded and guests
begin to complain, then delete one of the queue tiles and you're back
to your shorter path. This can be a bit complicated, so only use it
for rides you think will alternate between being popular and being
abandoned.

4.04 - Ride Exits [AABK]
---- 
This can be one of the hardest paths to construct. You want to keep
the distance short, but at the same time, you want to keep those nosy
guests off of it. What are you to do?

First, put a 'No Entry' banner sign at the front of the exit path.
That way, no guests can get onto the path. Second, keep the exit path
in a straight line for as much as possible. Try to have as few turns
and curves as possible. Also, if the nausea rating is 5.50 or higher,
place a Restroom on the exit path. In addition, don't be afraid to
have a First Aid Station on the exit path. And, of course, always have
benches and litter bins along the exit path.

(NOTE: If the nausea starts to take its toll on the guests quickly,
you will want to keep a Handyman 'working the line'. This will not
only keep the path clean, it will prevent problems in the future.)

4.05 - Scenic Footpaths [AABL]
---- 
As the title would imply, these are footpaths that generally do not
lead directly to any major section or attraction of your park. Rather,
they are small side paths that are lined with trees, bodies of water
or benches. They create a sense of calm, and you'll often find the
guests relaxing on the benches for a short while from time to time.

To help guests distinguish a scenic footpath from a more direct one,
you'll generally want to use a different material for the footpath. I
like using dirt as the medium for scenic paths, since they blend
better into my park, especially one that is full of trees and
artificial lakes.

4.06 - A Quick Tip... [AABM]
---- 
RCT2 provides you with a generous amount of footpaths, ranging from
dirt to stone. While they are all the same, you may prefer a certain
type, or want to use different path types for different areas or
themes.

For example, a nature path or a scenic path is most associated with
the dirt path. This doesn't necessarily enhance the purpose, but your
guests will notice it and give you positive feedback. If you are
dealing with classical themes and scenery, then stone paths tend to
work very well. Or, if you have a space age or futuristic park, then
red paths seem to work wonders.

While it is all really your opinion, you may want to mix-and-match
different themes and paths to see what works best. The same goes for
the path supports.

4.07 - ...And How About Another? [AABN]
---- 
Once your park gets very crowded, you will want to have intersections
as frequently as possible. One way to accomplish this is to have the
"square mile" approach. Simply put, this refers to intersections every
unit, so the spaces between are one square unit. Not only will this
herd guests along quickly, it leaves you room for scenery or for shops
and stalls. If there is one downside to this, though, it encourages
more guests to your park, which ends up defeating the purpose of the
whole approach.

4.08 - Avoiding Design Confusion [AABO]
---- 
Despite your abundance of Information Kiosks, guests will still get
lost on your paths. An easy way to prevent lost guests is to have an
Observation Tower or Double-Deck Observation Tower at each end of your
park. Not only will you get income from this popular ride, it lets
guests rest and see the park, which works as free advertising for
every ride! As stated earlier, it obviously keeps guests from getting
lost, as they have a panoramic view of every path! If lost guests
becomes a real struggle for you, consider this strategy.

As you can see, footpaths are among the most important aspect in your
park. If they are not properly designed, they can ruin your park's
atmosphere. Plus, it will be impossible to reach any rides!

4.09 - The Chairlift [AABP]
---- 
Usually available from the very beginning, the Chairlift is a good
Transport Ride to start with. However, it has some major
disadvantages--low speed and low capacity. However, with a cheap cost,
it works wonders for a small to medium sized park.

Chairlifts can operate in two mode: Continuous Circuit, and Shuttle.
The latter mode is perfect for the beginning years of your park, as a
complete circuit will cost you quite a bit of money. Also, Shuttle
Mode means you don't have to worry about using up a lot of money or
space.

Chairlifts work best when they travel over scenic areas. It gives
guests a chance to relax and view the beauty of your park. Plus,
Chairlifts can be built to a large height, so they act as a way to
easily locate major paths and attractions.

4.10 - The Elevator [AABQ]
---- 
The most specialized Transport Ride, the Elevator will be used less
frequently. However, if used correctly, it is also the most useful
Transport Ride. Simply, the Elevator makes multi-leveled parks a
breeze to navigate. It also allows for a special type of food court, a
"Sky Tower".

Whenever a park features an extensive amount of hills or levels, you
know an Elevator is the most practical Transport Ride. With its fairly
cheap cost and large capacity, you'll pay yourself back the moment you
build it. Also, with high populariy, the ride can be fairly expensive
to ride! And, like stated earlier, the "Sky Tower" can give you
'hidden' income.

For extremely complex parks with underground, level, and above ground
sections, having more than one Elevator in operation can be very wise
and profitable. It is far more practical than a Monorail or even a
Chairlift. However, for small parks, the Elevator isn't very
practical.

Again, the Elevator is specialized, and will only work in certain
conditions. So, before you build one, always make sure it will work
for you!

4.11 - The Monorail [AABR]
---- 
The most used Transport Ride, the Monorail is also the most practical
for nearly every type of park. High speed, high capacity and moderate
price equal out to one great transport!

Like the Chairlift, the Monorail operates in both Continuous Circuit
Mode and Shuttle Mode. While Continuous Circuit works, Shuttle Mode is
actually far more useful, even if you only get one train. With Shuttle
Mode, the train moves faster, so more guests ride per hour. That
equals out to more income from the ride. The Monorail also has three
types of trains: Retro, Small, Modern. While it all comes down to your
preferences, Modern is the most useful. It holds the most guests and
travels the fastest.

The worst aspect of the Monorail, however, is its inability to climb
inclines. Even small inclines slow the train significantly. Therefore,
try to keep the Monorail as flat as possible. If you can, run it
completely underground, or have it tunnel excessively. While small
inclines are somewhat tolerable, it really isn't worth the trouble.

Monorails are good for sight-seeing, as well. For example, build an
incomplete Monorail track and set the mode to Shuttle Mode. Open the
ride, and you'll notice that the train travels to the end of the
track, and simply goes back to the station. While it doesn't
necessarily transport guests anywhere, it does let them rest and see
the best parts of your park.

4.12 - Miniature Railroad [AABS]
---- 
One of the least used Transport Rides is actually one of the better.
While the Miniature Railroad must be a Continuous Circuit, it is
rather popular and it holds a huge amount of people. However, it can
get rather expensive, so only build it if you really need it. If you
want it for 'novelty', though, make sure it actually transports. The
worst thing you can do is have the track a circle. It makes guests
angry, and we all know what angry guests do...

The Miniature Railroad is even worse than the Monorail when it comes
to inclines. Never have inclines more than 20 ft. because it will
really slow down the trains. Ideally, you shouldn't have any grades on
your railroad at all. The ride performs best (and travels its fastest)
on flat, straight track.

Overall, the Miniature Railroad isn't your best option, but it works
well when you need it to.

4.13 - The Tram [AABT]
---- 
Probably your worst option overall, the Tram is not very good. Low
speed, low capacity, and horrible at making inclines, this ride is
better used as a full circuit sightseeing ride. While using it for
Transport is entirely possible, it really shouldn't be bothered with.

Section 5 - Expenditures & Finances [AAAL]
----------------------------------- 
Your park is your business. You have an obligation to make a profit,
to satisfy both yourself and your investors. Without a steady flow of
income, your park won't be able to expand, and will slowly fall into
decline and disrepair. If you want to succeed, you absolutely cannot
ignore the financial aspects of RCT2.

5.01 - Cash on Hand [AAAM]
---- 
Cash on Hand (COH) is exactly that; it is the cash that you use to
build rides and attract guests to your park. Of all your finances, it
is the most visible, and the most used. By looking at the lower-left
of your screen, you can track how much COH you have. If this number is
white, it means you have a positive amount of COH. If, however, the
amount is red, it means you have a negative amount of COH. It does not
mean you are in debt, though. (You can have negative COH but not be in
debt. See the sub-section on Fiscal Reports for more details.) If you
do have a negative amount of COH, it means you have a problem in your
park. You may be under-charging your guests, or you may be spending
more income than you are taking in. By using the fiscal reports, you
can easily see what the problem is. By fixing the problem, your
negative COH should and will quickly rise. (If the problem isn't fixed
within 1-2 months, then see the Last Resort sub-section for more
details.) Once your negative COH has risen, you can begin to build
more rides!

Obviously, every time you build a ride or attraction, your COH is
depleted. To see approximately how much your COH will deplete, check
the approx. costs of the rides and attractions. In other words, every
time you build a ride, it will tell you how much it will approx. cost.
That amount is what comes out of your COH. Therefore, if a ride
approx. costs $9000, that means that $9000 will approx. be drained
from your COH. Of course, if you only have COH of $7000, then you
won't be able to build the ride.

While building new rides is great, don't get too ambitious. You'll be
amazed and unaware how quickly your COH can deplete. While your COH
can easily be built back up due to wise pricing, you should always
take caution and plan ahead. A smart technique for the COH is to
always keep a minimum of $5000. That way, you always have a fair
amount, and don't have to worry about negative COH.

One more thing about COH; staff paychecks are taken straight out of
your COH. If you have many staff, that equals out to one huge lump sum
at the end of the month! You could happily be building along, then
suddenly fall into deep negative COH! Again, planning ahead is the way
to go. As soon as reach the 20th of the month, stop or yield
construction. Consider raising prices slightly, because you may lose
quite a bit of money. Once you see a large drop in your COH, you know
the month has passed. After that, you can begin building again, but
remember to lower those prices. If you don't, guests will be become
vandals.

5.02 - Fiscal Reports [AAAN]
---- 
Fiscal reports are a series of tools and graphs designed to help you
get the most out of your income and finances. It will show you
everything from your COH to weekly profit! When used wisely, fiscal
reports can help you prevent any long-term or future debt! So, let's
take a closer look, shall we?

A - Expenditures & Income 
------------------------- 
This first tab shows you the heart of your park. It shows you what
each part of your park is doing, in terms of taking in and taking out
of finances. It shows you the income from rides, the income from
shops, entrance admission, and so much more. Naturally, this is the
first tab you will check whenever you need to see your income.

Another important purpose of this tab is that it allows you to set up
loans. As you may already know, loans allow you to borrow money from
the bank. You can use this money to build any rides you so desire, but
there is a catch; you must pay back your loan, with interest.
Obviously, borrowing a huge lump sum can easily hurt you in the long
run, so, and I cannot state this enough, plan ahead. Know in advance
why you are taking out a loan, and why you are taking out the loan
amount. Before taking out a loan, ask yourself, "Can I pay back the
loan and the interest?" I recommend you take out a loan as a last
resort; it really should be, anyway.

Another advantage to the Expenditures/Income tab is that it allows you
to foresee any money problems, including debt. If you are taking in
less than you were the previous month, then there is a problem. From
there, you could try polling your guests. If they are commenting that
your entrance fee is low, raise it. If they are complaining, try
lowering your prices. (While this could actually worsen the problem,
guests tend to not pay at all when prices are too high.) Check the
Expenditures/Income tab every month to see how your park is doing. You
may just find a problem you didn't know about.

B - Weekly Profit 
----------------- 
This tab shows your park's weekly profit, but it tends to be
unreliable because it is always changing. It basically incorporates
all aspects of income: admission fees, ride fees, and, of course,
profits from shops/stalls and rides. Like the COH, this overall amount
may be red. Again, it doesn't necessarily mean your park is in debt.
Rather, it represents a problem that is keeping you from getting the
most out of your park. If the Weekly Profit is red, wait. More often
than not, it quickly changes back to normal. What usually happens is
after a rapid change in prices or paychecks, your profits compensate
by briefly operating in the red. Again, they will almost always
quickly change. Even if they don't, don't worry so much about them. It
is simply a way of managing which rides are taking in more than it
costs to maintain. It isn't designed to be used to judge your park's
success. You have the Expenditures/Income tab to do that!

C - Park Value 
-------------- 
This is a special way of measuring your Expenditures/Income. Park
value is simply what your park is worth, in terms of all the
rides/attractions, their ages, and so on. It is an extremely complex
formula, but is important, especially for scenarios whose goal is to
have a specific park value by a certain date. To increase and maintain
Park Value, always keep your rides new and in good condition. Always
have your rides checked regularly, and try replacing them with models
of the same. That way, you will be able to accomplish the two goals:
keeping your rides new, and keeping your rides in good condition.

D - Company Value 
----------------- 
This is all finances, combined. This is what you are ultimately
working for. Company value is COH and Park Value, minus your loan
[CV=COH+PV-L]. It is also the goal of some scenarios. While
entertaining guests and focusing on the rides is good, your overall
goal should be to increase your company value and pay off your loan.
Obviously, the more interest you must pay, the greater your loan will
end up being. So, every time you pay off a loan, your Company Value
will rise. Company Value, next to the scenario's goal, is the most
important aspect of RollerCoaster Tycoon 2, so always be aware of it.

5.03 - Special Financial Tools [AAAO]
---- 
RollerCoaster Tycoon 2 gives you two options of using your finances.
The first way is via marketing. By spending a certain amount of money
each week, you will, in time, regain it by encouraging more peeps to
come to your park. The second option is land purchasing. By purchasing
or gaining rights to a piece of land, you can increase the size of
your park, and use the extra size to either build new rides or stalls.

A - Marketing Campaigns 
----------------------- 
Advertising your Park 
--- 
While this is the most expensive option, it is also the best one for
attracting guests. This campaign includes all areas of your park,
especially newer areas you need to popularize. For each week that you
advertise with this campaign, expect an extra 100 people. Therefore,
advertising the full six weeks will give you roughly an increase of
600 guests. And, if park admission was set at $50, then figure an
increase of $30,000 after only six weeks. (Compare the $30,000 to the
$5000 spend on the campaign. You just made a profit of $25k.)

Free Park Admission Vouchers 
--- 
If you are rolling in the cash, than this is a good campaign to use.
It lets guests enter the park for free for a certain time. While you
may lose money at the gate, guests also become more willing to spend
money on stalls and rides. For the sly park builder, this means
raising all food and ride prices.

Reduced Park Fee Vouchers 
--- 
This campaign is exactly that; guests get 50% off the entrance fee. If
you charge $50, then the guests will get in for only $25. This is
useful when you need to make a surplus amount of cash, perhaps to pay
off a loan. While this campaign does not drive in as many guests as
you would expect, you also don't lose all admission fees for the
guests that DO come in.

Free Ride Vouchers 
--- 
This campaign should be used only for a new ride you want to
popularize. It is pretty self-explanatory; it allows guests to ride a
particular ride for free.

However, you might want to use it purposely to attract guests to a
certain area of the park, especially if that area is the area
containing the new ride.

Another use could be to draw attention to an old, aging ride like a
ten year old Merry-Go-Round, for example. Since you most likely charge
only $.10 for this ride, it can help bring guests back onto the old
ride. And if you're lucky, the ride may seem a long-term rise in
popularity.

Free Food & Drink Vouchers 
--- 
Like the Free Park admissions, this campaign lets peeps get food and
drinks for free. Use this campaign only if you charge entrance
admissions. Otherwise, you will lose a ton of money. In
charge-for-rides-and-stalls only admissions, food and drinks make up
the core of your income. This is why you should only use this campaign
if you are running a park that charges entrance fees.

Advertise your Rides 
--- 
This is a copy of the Free Ride Admissions campaign, only it doesn't
cost you any money. (In this case, it means you won't lose any money
from free admissions.) Therefore, use it just how you would use the
Free Ride Admissions campaign.

B - Buying Land 
--------------- 
This is pretty simple. Click on the tab that allows you to buy land,
and start buying! Any land with a white sign can be purchased.
However, there is a catch. Land values vary from scenario to scenario.
And just because you can buy land doesn't necessarily mean that you
can buy connecting land. Often times, you can buy land on one side of
a highway, but you can't actually buy the highway. So, how do you
connect the land? You'd have to purchase construction rights...

C - Construction Rights 
----------------------- 
Construction rights are a specialized type of land purchasing. Instead
of actually owning the land, you buy the rights to build on it. In
other words, you can build above or below it, but you can't alter the
land, and you can't build directly on it. This is how you would
connect land on two sides of the highway. You purchase the rights to
the highway, then build a path over or under the highway. Except in
rare cases, construction rights are always used with land purchasing.

Section 6 - Sandbox Mode [AAAP]
------------------------ 
New to RollerCoaster Tycoon 2 is the sandbox mode. This is a
fantastical area free of all financial and physical limitations. It's
best used for designing and experimenting with new roller coaster
designs. But you can even create your very own scenarios if you so
desire. In this section, I will give a basic outline of how each mode
works.

6.01 - The Roller Coaster Designer [AAAQ]
---- 
As soon as you open the Roller Coaster Designer, you'll be taken to
the sandbox mode. Next, you'll be given the option to choose up to
four types of roller coasters. A menu will pop up with your four
coaster types. Select one type. You can choose to build a
pre-fabricated roller coaster, but you originally came here to
practice, right? Let's choose the option "Build Custom Coaster." Build
your roller coaster like you normally would, starting with the station
platform. Once your station platform is built, you can start to build
your lift hill. For most coasters, this involves a chain lift, so make
sure you click the chain icon once you start your incline. For some
coasters, though, there are different options. For example, the Giga
Coaster has a Cable Lift Hill, and the Twister and Stand-up Twister
Roller Coasters each have Launched Lift Hills. Once the lift hill is
built, you can start to construct the coaster's first drop. Most
people will make this the steepest drop on the ride, but of course you
can build your ride however you choose. A very important option to
note is the different grades of drops. Depending on the type of
coaster you are using, you may be able to have slight grades, steep
grades, or even vertical grades! After choosing the one that's right
for your coaster, you can then proceed into the rest of the ride.
However, there are numerous special tracks options available. For
example, most people like to put a vertical loop in their track. Some
enjoy squeezing in a Barrel Roll or two. Whatever suits you will do.

One of the most useful features of the Roller Coaster Designer is its
real time calculation of your ride statistics. Should you make a
coaster that is far too intense or too nauseating, it will be shown in
red. Anytime a stat is in red, you know that it won't go over well
with your guests. While the guests can tolerate somewhat uncomfortable
experiences, as a ride designer, you are obligated to keep them both
entertained and healthy. No one wants to get sick on a ride that
promised a fun time.

Once you've built a roller coaster that you're happy with, you will be
able to save it as a pre-fabricated design for use in the scenarios.
There are a few things to keep in mind, though. First, remember that
the calculated stats made in the sandbox modes are estimated, and can
change in any given scenario based on many different factors, many of
which are out of your control. Second, remember that your roller
coaster does cost money within the scenarios, and the cost changes
depending on several different factors. The bigger and more complex
your coaster is, the bigger the bill will be. Therefore, don't go
overboard with your design. You still need to make it affordable.

Recall that when you first started the Roller Coaster Designer, you
were able to select up to four different types of roller coasters, and
from there, you could also choose a pre-built design. Go ahead and
open one. Many of the pre-built designs date back to the original
RollerCoaster Tycoon. In the original game, they couldn't be modified.
Now they can. You might want to add scenery to one of the designs, for
example, or add a vertical drop. It's all up to you. I recommend you
save the coaster under a different file name, though, instead of
overwriting the original.

6.02 - The Scenario Editor [AAAR]
---- 
Are you the true tycoon? Did you blow through the scenarios like you
owned them? Well, how would you like to be the creator of your own
scenario? True good to be true? No, it's true! It's called the
Scenario Editor, and in only a few minutes, you'll have the world's
greatest scenario! Let's now take a closer look at this powerful
tool...

The Scenario Editor allows you to work with a maximum of 128 rides and
attractions. There are no restrictions; any ride may be chosen. After
making your choices, you can then proceed to choose what shops and
stalls are available. Once you've made your decisions, you will then
be able to control the scenario's research and development. You have
full control of what is developed, and when it becomes available.
Thus, you can force a scenario to follow a consistent theme if you so
choose, or you can enable everything for the power player. Your next
task requires you use the Landscape Editor. You can choose up to three
styles for the park entrance, various bodies of water and even
determine your park's boundaries, with a limit of 256 by 256 units.
Unfortunately, there is no way to create a scenario without an
objective, making a park similar to "Mega Park" impossible. Anyhow,
you decide whether your park will own all the land between its
boundaries, or if some land must be purchased, or acquired via
construction rights. After setting up the boundaries, you must then
create the entrance path. To do that, set the arrows so they go AWAY
from the park entrance. And, on the subject of paths, you can choose
from nine different types. You may prefer to have a park by a highway,
or have a highway that is between a park! You may prefer to have a
mountainous park with dirt paths, or have a park within a valley,
featuring space-age footpaths! The Landscape Editor, combined with the
footpaths, allows you to do all of this! Once the park is set up, you
then proceed to the financial menus. You decide if your park will use
money or not, and you also decide how much of a loan is available. In
addition to the loan, you can also choose the rate of interest.
Finally, you choose the starting COH, or the amount of debt. After
setting up the financial objective, you proceed to the guests' tab. In
this tab, you decide how much money each guest enters with, and
whether or not they prefer intense rides. (NOTE: This option affects
the scenario. Should guests prefer less intense rides, stick with
Gentle Rides. Should they prefer more intense rides, then roller
coasters are your bag!) Finally, the overall objective of the scenario
must be set. If money is allowed, then you have the option of choosing
objectives that involve park value, ride income, or overall financial
upstanding. If money is not allowed, then you have the option of
choosing objectives that involves having a certain number of guests
with a minimal park rating, or having a certain number of coasters
with a minimum length or minimum excitement rating.

Once you are happy with your scenario and its objective, go ahead and
save it. You will be able to classify it in a couple of ways, and it
will then appear on the main menu as a playable scenario. Since the
scenario is saved as a typical data file, you can share it with others
if you would like, or you can upload it to Atari's Ride Exchange.

Section 7 - Tips & Tricks [AAAS]
------------------------- 
It's one thing to build an amusement park and have some fast roller
coasters in it. But maintaining your park, and making it a truly fun
experience is a completely different manner. If you want your guests
to enjoy their stay and return in the future (which means more profit
for your park,) then you need to master some simple, yet effective,
tips & tricks. Much of the information detailed in the following
sub-sections are to be applied over the long term, because it's the
gradual nature of the tips that makes them so effective to the overall
success of your park.

7.01 - Tips for Countering Vandalism [AABD]
---- 
Face it; it happens. It happens in every park, and it will happen to
you! I am talking about vandalism, which is single-handedly the most
frustrating thing in RCT2! It seems for no reason, guests like to
destroy your benches and litter bins. Vandalism ruins the park's
reputation, and makes everyone who sees it angry. That only leads to
more vandalism. As the park manager, how will you combat this?

As you may have noticed, most vandalism starts with litter. And where
does litter most commonly collect? If you said food areas, you're
correct. So, one way to combat vandalism is to create food courts. Not
only will you cut down on the litter, but you will stop vandalism in
its first stage. But having one Handyman and Security Guard on patrol,
vandals had better beware!

But vandalism doesn't only occur at food areas. Vandalism can also
occur when there are long, empty paths. Bored or tired guests soon
become vandals. Therefore, NEVER make "empty" paths, and NEVER make
the distance between attractions extremely long. If possible, try to
have something at every corner. For example, have a ride on one side,
and shops and stalls on the other. By having guest pre-occupied, they
are less likely to entertain themselves by being vandals.

Vandalism also occurs in an area most people don't think about: the
queue line. You may notice that the queue lines are sometimes filled
with angry guests. To help prevent this unneeded vandals-in-the-making
crowd, always put queue TVs in your line, even if you think you don't
need it. This also allows you to beef up the queue line, as guests
won't get bored as often.

Another easy-to-miss section of vandalism occurs in the "Sky Tower".
By having only one way to get out, these often crowded areas make
plenty of vandals. To prevent this, try to make your "Sky Tower" as
wide as possible, and always have Handymen and Security Guards
patrolled up there. Also, put TVs on every queue unit, as the Elevator
line is always packed!

Hopefully, these strategies will help you combat vandalism. On a final
note, remember to have plenty of Information Kiosks and Restrooms.
These little nuisances can quickly erupt into major vandalism.

7.02 - Working With the Elevator [AABF]
--- 
I have thrown the term "Sky Tower" around several times now, but you
may not know what exactly I am referring to. Here's a brief
explanation, and why I think they are a great addition to any park...

To create a "Sky Tower," you will need to have the Elevator transport
ride available. As you are aware, the Elevator moves guests up and
down, over a total of four levels. For most practical purposes, the
Elevator need not rise much higher than just two levels. However, as
your park expands, your guests will need (and expect) the park to grow
with them. They will want more places to rest, more places to eat at,
and even more bathrooms. When you begin dealing with a colossal park,
you should consider adding more platforms to the Elevator. At the very
top, there should be a small plaza with some restaurants, benches and
other amenities. This is what I refer to as a "Sky Tower." While
insignificant by itself, it will bring revenue to your Elevator, as
well as make your park that much more exciting for your guests.

So, how do you build one? Obviously, you must first start with the
Elevator. Build it like any other Transport Ride, but always save the
fourth station for the "Sky Tower". Once you finally get to it, first
construct the exit path. After you make that, make the entrance queue.
Then, construct a small path that winds around the entire Elevator,
encompassing both the entrance and exit paths. Once you do all that,
widen the path by about three to four units. Place shops and stalls
around the path, and also place Restrooms and Information Kiosks.
Finally, place benches and litter bins, like you were constructing a
food court. Then, open the Elevator. Remember to hire Handymen and
Security Guards to work up there. The "Sky Tower" is a hidden
vandalism center, and having just one Security Guard makes all the
difference in the world. If done correctly, the "Sky Tower" will
become a popular area of your park. Not only will it lighten the load
on your footpaths, it give you income you otherwise wouldn't have; you
can charge for the Elevator, shops and stalls!

As successful as this little area can be, never make an Elevator just
for the "Sky Tower". Ironically, guests won't pay just to get to the
"Sky Tower". Make sure the "Sky Tower" is always the final destination
on the Elevator, not the only destination.

7.03 - Maximizing Ride Excitement [AAAT]
---- 
Technically, the following tip to increase ride excitement is a
limited glitch, as it only works on the Inverted Impulse roller
coaster, and even then, the final result is not what's originally
advertised. But I'm getting ahead of myself. Let's go back to the
start. If your park is hurting for a new roller coaster, there's a
quick and easy way to guarantee profit, because you're about to build
yourself a roller coaster with an estimated Excitement rating of
650.00! Here's the specifics, which must be followed to the letter...

Build the station platform, followed by a vertical incline about 170
ft. tall. After that, build a mirrored incline that brings the coaster
back down to ground level.

Returning to the station platform, build a second vertical incline on
the opposite side as the first. But note that this second incline must
be about 175 ft. tall. After that, build a mirrored incline that
brings the coaster back down to ground level.

Let's review. You should have a station platform in the center of the
coaster, with two vertical inclines on either side. One of the
inclines is about 170 ft. tall, and the other is about 175 ft. tall.
At the end of each vertical incline is another line of vertical track,
bringing both ends of the coaster to ground level. Now, to each of
these broken pieces of track, add another vertical incline, but this
time, make it as high as possible.

Your roller coaster now has a snake-like shape to it, with two very
high towers at either end. You're ready to test the ride. Make sure
the Inverted Impulse ride mode is set to "Shuttle," and the launch
speed to 74 MPH. Make the number of circuits 7. Remember, you must
follow these instructions exactly, or this glitch will not work
properly.

When the results come in, the excitement should be 650.00! (Or
higher!)

But remember I said the final result is not what's advertised? Go
ahead and open the ride. You'll be saddened to see the Excitement
rating go way down, to a measly 14.60. But on the bright side, that
Excitement will still guarantee a lot of profit for at least a couple
of years, until the novelty factor wears off.

7.04 - Working With Station Platforms [AABG]
---- 
Sometimes, you will want a coaster to be built completely above
ground. However, getting a station platform up there will be quite the
task. Unless, of course, you're reading this FAQ...

The first way to get a raised station platform is to raise the ground
to the desired height. After constructing the now raised station
platform, simply lower the ground, and no one will ever know you
raised it...

The second way to get a raised station platform is to start
construction with an incline. After reaching the desired height,
switch construction to the station platform. Once the now raised
station platform is built, go back and demolish the incline.

A simple way to get a pre-fabricated ride raised is to build part of
it on a high hill or building. That way, you don't waste any extra
money building extra track or raising the ground.

7.05 - Dealing With Ride Accidents [AABH]
---- 
Roller coasters are complex pieces of machinery, and thus, are prone
to error from time to time. No matter how secure you make your park,
and no matter how many Mechanics you have, a roller coaster
malfunction is inevitable. Worse yet is a crash. And even worse is a
crash in which fatalities occur.

First, always have a minimum of three brakes before the station. Make
the brakes nearest to the station slow the train to 9 MPH, then set
the outer ones to 13 MPH and 18 MPH, respectively. And before these
set of brakes, you should have at least two to three block brakes. Not
only will this allow you more trains, it stops the proceeding train so
the one in front of it can get into the station safely.

Another unspoken rule: Always have Mechanics inspect a coaster every
10 minutes. Not only will this prevent crashes, Mechanics will also
upgrade and fix worn brakes.

Never, ever put a large drop before a station. Brakes, no matter how
advanced, usually can't stop a train quick enough so that it gets into
the station safely. Even a train coming into the station at a mere 10
mph is more than enough to cause some serious damage to the train it
smacks into.

If you are building a rather lengthy coaster, try putting brakes
halfway through the ride. Not only will this lower the intensity a
little, it gives the train in front a farther lead, which delays the
probability of a crash even more!

When your coaster does crash, unfortunately, there are ways to get
guests to stay on it. First, repaint the entire ride. Second, change
the trains that run on the track. If you're lucky, this step may
actually add excitement! And, if it makes you feel at ease, rename the
ride. While guests will eventually forget all about the crash, these
steps make guests get back on quicker.

7.06 - Transportation Networks [AABI]
---- 
As your park gets more popular, your footpath network will evolve into
a complex mess of elevated paths, wide walkways and dead ends. Nothing
is more frustrating for a guest than to get lost within your park,
despite the fact they may have a map in their possession. Not to
mention that the busiest sections of your park are going to be
jam-packed with guests, many of whom will grow angry out of their
frustration because they can't get where they want to go. As you will
quickly learn, your footpath network is just as important as the rides
in your park. After all, what good is the world's tallest coaster
going to do for your park if guests can't figure out how to get to it?

The best thing to do is plan ahead. From the very start, make every
path a minimum of two units wide, and wider if that path is a "main
path". That way, guests will always have plenty of room to walk.
However, as your park gets more publicity, the footpaths will still
prove to be too small. At this point, you want to widen all paths by
at least two units, and wider if the occasion calls for it. However,
you also want to lighten the traffic on your footpaths. This is where
Transport Rides become your biggest investment. Again, plan ahead.
From the start of your park, have a small Monorail or Chairlift
operating at Shuttle Mode. Not only will this encourage guests to take
a break from walking, it also gives you income that you will need
early on. As the footpaths get bombarded from guests, add more
stations to the Monorail or Chairlift. If at all possible, try to make
a complete circuit that goes around the outer perimeter of your park.
While it is more expensive, you can switch to Continuous Circuit mode,
which adds more trains. More trains equal more people on the ride.
More people on the ride equals less people on the paths. Also, more
people on the ride equal more income!

7.07 - Having Fun with Vandals [AABE]
----
Are the guests driving you insane with their endless complaints?
Sometimes, you just want to take out your frustration on the peeps.
And I can't blame you. You work hard to build a park, and all they do
is trash it and complain. Well, for those who are bold enough, there
is a way to truly stop that unforgiving vandalism. Note, however, that
it will really stiff your park rating. If you still want to do it,
though, here goes...

In an empty area of your park, make a footpath area about 5x5 units
wide. Then, place nothing but benches on each unit. Finally, scroll
through the guest list. Anytime you find a guest who is red in the
face, click on them. These guests are vandals, and will commit
vandalism and other vile acts very soon. After clicking on them, use
the pincers button and move them to the newly-created area. Let them
break a bench, then check their faces. You will notice a BIG
difference; they will be happy. From there, move them back into the
crowd.

This seems like a pretty plan, actually. Except, there's a catch.
Well, some guests will get happy only to be miserable again. Keep
watching them, and you'll soon notice they have committed acts of
vandalism yet again. To prevent this, simply leave the guests in that
area, which is really a "jail". As ironic as it sounds, only half of
the guests you put into the "jail" are really worthy to be brought
back to the crowd. So, by simply leaving them there, they can only
hurt what is in the "jail". And, once nothing is left, they are stuck
to regret their bad actions. However, the park rating will plummet
because of this.

Section 8 - Easter Eggs & Secrets [AAAU] 
---------------------------------
Note: The following "Easter Eggs" are applied by renaming a guest to
the name listed in the title of each sub-section.

8.01 - Chris Sawyer [AAAV]
----- 
The guest will often stop to take pictures of your park and rides.

8.02 - Simon Foster [AAAW]
----- 
The guest will often stop to paint portraits of your park and rides.

8.03 - Melanie Warn [AABU]
----- 
The guest becomes very, very happy and spends an excess amount of
money.

8.04 - Katie Brayshaw [AABV]
----- 
The guest will often stop to wave at other guests, which raises
happiness.

8.05 - John Wardley [AAAX]
----- 
The guest will often think 'WOW!' while riding your rides.

8.06 - Damon Hill [AABW]
----- 
The guest will drive twice as fast on the Go-Karts.

8.07 - Mr. Bean [AABX]
----- 
The guest will drive twice as slow on the Go-Karts.

8.08 - Tony Day [AAAY]
----- 
The guest is frequently hungry, and buys lots of hamburgers.

8.09 - David Ellis [AAAZ]
-----
The guest says 'And here we are on ___'.

Note: The following "Easter Eggs" and secrets are actually what could
be considered "hacks" and "glitches," as they affect the programming
of the game in ways the developers did not intend. As such, read the
following sub-sections at your own risk.

8.10 - Trainers [AABA]
----- 
"Trainers" are automated third party programs that change the
programming of RollerCoaster Tycoon 2 to allow players to instantly
generate revenue, satisfy the scenario goals, or other interesting
things. To put matters another way, "trainers" basically enable you to
cheat your way through RollerCoaster Tycoon 2. They are frowned upon
by the serious players of the community, although they often prove fun
in scenarios like Mega Park that have no set scenario.

As of 2008, many of the "trainers" are no longer available, or no
longer work on the latest versions of RollerCoaster Tycoon 2.
Therefore, I cannot recommend the use of any of them. They may have
not been updated in a very long time, and I'd guess that many of them
simply just won't work any more. But go ahead and use Google or any
other search engine to find some. And there are working ones, then
cool, use them. But, as always, you use them at your own risk.

8.11 - Instant Revenue Glitch [AABB]
----- 
This glitch first requires that your park has the Mechanical Style
scenery theme available for use. Make a 4x4 platform of metal blocks.
Next, stack it so it is 4x4 units high. Once this is done, construct a
ride from the Gentle or Thrill categories. The ride will require a
negative amount of funds, but you are not restricted from constructing
the ride. As soon as it's built, the negative funds go directly into
your COH, although the game will not reflect this in the Finances
menu. The glitch works as many times as you need quick, easy cash.

--------------------END OF DOCUMENT--------------------
 

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